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Pupil Premium

What is Pupil Premium?

Pupil premium refers to an amount of money the government pays schools for children who meet certain criteria, otherwise known as disadvantaged children. The government believes that the pupil premium, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most.

The pupil premium was introduced in April 2011 and is allocated to schools to work with pupils who have been registered for free school meals at any point in the last six years (known as ‘Ever 6 FSM’).

Schools also receive funding for children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months, and children of service personnel.

What about Pupil Premium in Ludworth Primary?

Pupil Premium in 2020/21

Desired Outcome

Action and Rationale

Cost

Success Criteria

Quality teaching for all

To ensure all children, including those who are disadvantaged, have access to appropriate support within lessons and intervention outside of lessons.

Maintain 1.6 HLTA that school would not normally be able to afford so that children have access to appropriate support and timely intervention.

 

Partially fund an entry level TA to support learning of the most disadvantaged children in Early Years department (supplementing EYPP).

 

 

£33,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

£16,700

Includes £1,500 EYPP

  • Monitoring shows that teaching assistants are effectively deployed to support progress of disadvantaged children.
  • Data analysis shows that significant proportions of children in each class make at least expected progress – very small cohorts are considered when evaluating this.

Targeted Support

To ensure that disadvantaged children who have a special educational need have access to practical, specialist equipment so that they can access learning at a higher level than otherwise.

SENCO to investigate a variety of equipment to support disadvantaged children with SEN. For example:

-Motor skills development resources

-Clicker

-SEN reading hard and software

£1,000

  • Appropriate equipment purchased.
  • Lesson observations show that equipment is used effectively to support learning.
  • Data analysis shows that children attracting pupil premium are making good progress in maths concepts.

To ensure that disadvantaged children do not suffer further loss of education during isolation / lockdown.

During lockdown, teachers set work tasks using the internet. In some households, there was no access to the internet or insufficient access to devices so that children could access learning videos and activities. It has since been shown that learning is more effective if children have some face to face time (over the internet) with their teachers so that tasks can be explained. This money will support the purchase of some devices for home learning, 4G hubs, development of school capabilities such as using ITSS to set up TEAMs for classes, train staff and train parents.

£4,800

  • Equipment purchased.
  • Google system set up so that school maintains remote control over devices.
  • TEAMs system developed.
  • Staff, children and parents trained on TEAMS
  • Remote learning policy drawn up
  • Acceptable use agreement drawn up ready to share with parents loaning equipment.
  • Register of attendance at remote sessions kept and follow up action taken for non-attenders.

Other Approaches

To remove stigma through financial inequality by eradicating the differences in school between the ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’.

Children’s perceptions of themselves as ‘poor’ or disadvantaged can be a limiting factor in their own aspirations and perceptions of where they are headed in life. By eradicating perceivable differences in school, children will not self-limit. (e.g. providing PE kit)

£1000

  • Equipment has been purchased as required, so that there is no clear, visible difference between children who ‘have’ and those who do not.

To ensure that finance is not a barrier to families participating fully in school life and enjoying all of the benefits of school trips, including residential visits.

School uniform, trips and events such as school fairs can be expensive for families which can result in either children missing out or school placing undue stress on families. Therefore, money is put aside to supplement, where necessary. Families are encouraged to come to school and talk about issues that may affect children taking a full part in school life. This money will also subsidise trips generally to keep the cost down for all families because there are many families who are working but are not well off.

 

£2,000

  • Letters include a sentence that ensures families know to come into school to discuss potential financial barriers
  • All disadvantaged children have the opportunity to take a full part in school life. 
  • School trips generally are subsidised by school.

Total

£58,700

 

Pupil Premium in 2019/20

Update and evaluation: It was difficult to fully evaluate the effectiveness of Pupil Premium funding during the academic year 2019/20 due to the coronavirus pandemic.  School suffered partial closure and further absences due to isolation. Partial closure and absences, in addition to national measures such as the cancellation of primary statutory assessment, meant that it was not possible to use pupil outcomes as a measure of  the success of pupil premium spending. The vast majority of money was spent as outlined in the plan, for example, to support wages and purchase resources. The money that was outlined to support financial equality was used to provide resources for all children to support home learning. This ensured that all children had access to the resources they needed, such as stationery items. Money that was ear marked to support school trips was partially spent, as two whole school trips at reduced cost for all and more heavily subsidised for some, were carried  out from September 2019 to February 2020. The rest of the money was carried forward to the financial year 2020/21 and was used to support the purchase of MyOn which helped children to have access to electronic reading at home to support progress in reading, including through the second partial closure of schools in January 2021. 

In 2019/20 we have estimated that we will receive £45,900 in pupil premium funding. This is how we have planned to spend our pupil premium money this year:

Desired Outcome

Action and Rationale

Cost

Success Criteria

Quality teaching for all

To ensure all children, including those who are disadvantaged, have access to appropriate support within lessons and intervention outside of lessons.

Maintain 1.6 HLTA that school would not normally be able to afford so that children have access to appropriate support and timely intervention.

Partially fund an entry level TA to support learning of the most disadvantaged children in Early Years department (supplementing EYPP).

£33,200

£3,900

  • Monitoring shows that teaching assistants are effectively deployed to support progress of disadvantaged children.
  • Data analysis shows that significant proportions of children in each class make at least expected progress – very small cohorts are considered when evaluating this.

Targeted Support

To ensure that disadvantaged children who have a special educational need have access to practical, specialist equipment so that they can access learning at a higher level than otherwise.

SENCO to investigate a variety of equipment to support disadvantaged children with SEN. For example:

-Motor skills development resources

-Clicker

-SEN reading hard and software

£1,000

  • Appropriate equipment purchased.
  • Lesson observations show that equipment is used effectively to support learning.
  • Data analysis shows that children attracting pupil premium are making good progress in maths concepts.

To ensure that LAC children have appropriate support both academically and behaviourally.

All 3 LAC have SEM difficulties and need support at times. This money goes towards paying for the appropriate support.

£4,800

  • Expected progress in reading, writing and maths made because support is provided.
  • Children are beginning to develop  strategies to manage their emotions effectively

Other Approaches

To remove stigma through financial inequality by eradicating the differences in school between the ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’.

Children’s perceptions of themselves as ‘poor’ or disadvantaged can be a limiting factor in their own aspirations and perceptions of where they are headed in life. By eradicating perceivable differences in school, children will not self-limit. (e.g. providing PE kit)

£1000

  • Equipment has been purchased as required, so that there is no clear, visible difference between children who ‘have’ and those who do not.

To ensure that finance is not a barrier to families participating fully in school life and enjoying all of the benefits of school trips, including residential visits.

School uniform, trips and events such as school fairs can be expensive for families which can result in either children missing out or school placing undue stress on families. Therefore, money is put aside to supplement, where necessary. Families are encouraged to come to school and talk about issues that may affect children taking a full part in school life. This money will also subsidise trips generally to keep the cost down for all families because there are many families who are working but are not well off.

£2,000

  • Letters include a sentence that ensures families know to come into school to discuss potential financial barriers
  • All disadvantaged children have the opportunity to take a full part in school life. 
  • School trips generally are subsidised by school.

Pupil Premium Spending 2018/19

Below are details of the progress and attainment of our Key Stage 2 children who left our school in July 2019.

Key Stage 2 Reading Writing Maths

Progress score for disadvantaged pupils

4.3

4.7

4.4

National average for non disadvantaged pupils

not yet known

 

 

Number of disadvantaged pupils

3

3

3

Average Scaled Score for disadvantaged pupils in reading 106, in maths 109.

All three disadvantaged children achieved at least expected standard in reading, writing and maths.

One disadvantaged child achieved Higher Standard in Reading and two achieved this in Maths.

An evaluation of our Pupil Premium spending for 2018/19 can be found at the bottom of this page.